Gifts for traveling to japan

Japanese objects and their meaning

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Are you passionate about Japan and consider yourself a Japanophile, or do you have a friend or family member who also loves Japan? If you are looking for ideas and inspiration for Christmas or for any other date, we give you a list of Japanese gifts for Christmas. This is a selection of items inspired by Japan or related to Japan that will please any fan of the land of the rising sun.

On the other hand, there are the illustrations of our “Ukiyo-e” collection, specifically for printing. These are different exclusive illustrations, different from the drawings for coloring and some well-known prints such as The Great Wave of Kanagawa by Katsushika Hokusai.

Craft-related items are an ideal gift for those who like Japan and like to build and make things with their own hands. There are many miniature paper models of Japanese temples, shrines and castles, for example. And also many Japanese-inspired constructions from brands such as LEGO or Nanoblock.

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Giving a gift in Japan is much more than just giving a simple detail to someone; it is often a social obligation full of symbolism and tradition. From souvenirs after a trip to offerings on special occasions, all gifts have to follow a set of standards of presentation, amount and quality.

When a gift is offered, it is customary for the recipient to initially refuse to accept it up to three times! This is a very Japanese way of acting, which we can see even when offering to taste food, offering to help, etc. However, despite these supposed refusals, the receiver always accepts the gift, but not before giving these polite refusals, as all this is governed by a cultural rule. There are many occasions when a Japanese person will refuse an offer right off the bat, even if deep down he or she wants to accept it.

When giving a gift, you should also bow politely and give the gift with both hands, palms up. The receiver will receive it in the same way, with both hands and bowing politely (much like how you receive business cards).

Meaning of gifts in Japan

I wanted to start this list with one of my favorite gifts for travelers, which was actually given to me by my mother and I currently have it in my living room: my wooden world map. Those of you who follow me on my Instagram account will surely have seen it behind my directs and in some of my stories, and you always ask me where to buy it!

Material gifts are great, however… nothing like giving travel credit to spend on experiences and for that reason the company Civitatis, one of the largest in the world, has created the possibility of giving cards of “X €”, where you choose the amount to give. In this way you give away credit that your dear friend or relative can then spend on the full range of excursions offered by the web. Ten out of ten.

If you are looking for original gift ideas for travelers who know they use a reflex camera, here you have this personalized strap for the camera, which seems to me the most original and you can also customize with the initials of him or her. It will be the envy of all photographers. It will set the trend as an emerging photographer. Everyone will want to wear the same strap. No doubt about it friends

What to bring back from Japan

It would also be valid something like a “souvenir” but with criteria. A “pata negra” book that talks about the city where the university is located, if possible with a lot of photographs, for example?

I already knew about the cards and I’m carrying my good pack of cards. And to tell you the truth I am looking forward to a situation like Bill Murray’s in Lost in Translation when he arrives in Japan: a while bowing to everyone, handing out cards, looking at them carefully and attentively, thanking them a thousand times, … I can’t wait

Hi, I need help… The girl I like will participate in the BON ODORI, she is a lover of Japanese culture and I would like to give her a gift. I was thinking of bringing a bouquet of flowers or a box of chocolates(I’ve seen in anime that they bring that), but I’m afraid of insulting someone for the event or maybe I should bring something else?

The issue of gifts in Japan is one that is subject to these kinds of unwritten rules. So, if you need to send a gift to Japan to thank a host, or a business partner, or you are going to visit someone’s home while you are there, or you are invited to a celebration to which you will bring a gift…there are things you need to know.

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