Did vikings travel to america

How the Vikings came to America

Indice

Viking voyages, discoveries and settlements in North America were first written about in two sagas: the Saga of the Greenlanders written in 1200, and the Saga of Erik the Red, written in 1260.[13] These are anonymously authored accounts that mix fiction and fact about events that had happened two centuries earlier, transmitted orally.

These are anonymously authored stories in which fiction and fact are mixed about events that happened two centuries earlier transmitted orally, so scholars have had to rely on supplementary scientific data to establish the greater or lesser certainty of their fantastic content.[13][12][12] The sagas are also known as “the saga of the Greenlanders” and “the saga of Erik the Red”, written in 1260.

Despite the loss of contact with the Greenland settlements, the Danish government continued to regard Greenland as a possession, and the island’s existence was never forgotten by European geographers. [13][12] European whalers made occasional stops on the island during the 17th century, and in 1721, a mercantile and missionary expedition led by Hans Egede was made to Greenland, on the grounds that, if there were still Viking inhabitants in Greenland, they would remain Catholic and should be reformed, just as the Christians of northern Europe had been. This expedition found no surviving populations of European origin, but it initiated Danish colonization in America, with a stable colony on the island that asserted Denmark’s claims of sovereignty over Greenland.[18][19][19

When the Vikings arrived

Guided by satellite imagery, a scientific team led by space archaeologist Sarah Parcak has discovered traces of the second known Viking settlement in America on a promontory at Point Rosee on the western tip of the island of Newfoundland, Canada.

Sarah Parcak uses satellite imagery to look for irregularities in the ground, potentially caused by man-made structures underneath. She has previously used this technique to find ancient sites in Egypt and, in particular, the location of the great lighthouse at Portus near Rome and several other buildings.

In the case of the Vikings , this kind of discovery is complicated because their constructions were preferably made of wood and have disappeared. But they left their mark on the terrain, reports the BBC .

It overlooked two bays, offering protection to ships from any wind direction. Parcak saw oddities in the soil that highlighted patterns and discolorations suggesting man-made, artificial structures, possibly even communal houses.

In what year did the Vikings arrive in America?

The study examined wooden artifacts from a previously undated Viking settlement in Newfoundland, Canada, which provide the earliest known record of humans crossing the Atlantic to reach the Americas.

When the Vikings arrived at L’Anse aux Meadows, they cut trees with metal blades that were not made by the indigenous people living in the area at the time. The pieces of wood left in the settlement came from three different trees.

“The clear increase in carbon-14 production that occurred between 992 and 993 has been detected in tree ring archives around the world,” says Michael Dee, lead author of the study and associate professor of Isotopic Chronology at the University of Groningen, the Netherlands.

This date suggests that this is the earliest known presence of Europeans on the continent before Christopher Columbus, as well as the earliest evidence of all human migration and exploration that the Atlantic had been crossed, Dee said.

Because the Vikings did not stay in America.

The study examined wooden artifacts from a previously undated Viking settlement in Newfoundland, Canada, that provide the earliest known record of humans crossing the Atlantic to reach the Americas.

When the Vikings arrived at L’Anse aux Meadows, they cut trees with metal blades that were not made by the indigenous people living in the area at the time. The pieces of wood left in the settlement came from three different trees.

“The clear increase in carbon-14 production that occurred between 992 and 993 has been detected in tree ring archives around the world,” says Michael Dee, lead author of the study and associate professor of Isotopic Chronology at the University of Groningen, the Netherlands.

This date suggests that this is the earliest known presence of Europeans on the continent before Christopher Columbus, as well as the earliest evidence of all human migration and exploration that the Atlantic had been crossed, Dee said.

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