Do you need vaccine to travel to south africa

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Indice

Know the necessary vaccinations to travel to African countries. We inform you about the vaccinations required by each African country to protect against Yellow Fever, Malaria and other diseases.

Vaccinations for travel to African countries are usually the polio vaccine, yellow fever, tetanus, hepatitis A, typhoid fever, cholera or meningococcal meningitis, but it is not necessary to get all of them. It depends on the destination, as for example there is a special type of vaccine for traveling to Kenya, as there are also vaccines to go to South Africa different from the other regions.

The first recommendation if you are about to travel to countries in Africa, Asia or South America is to go to the doctor. He/she will be the one who will be able to inform you accurately and clearly if you need to take any medication or get vaccinated before traveling to any of these destinations.

Vaccination against yellow fever is carried out for two different purposes: 1. To prevent the international spread of the disease by protecting countries from the risk of importation or spread of the yellow fever virus.

Requirements for travel to south africa from colombia

Of course, you must have your passport in force before traveling to South Africa, a document that must meet these two requirements: It must have an expiration date of at least 30 days after the date of departure from the country and have 2 blank pages.

Malaria treatment is advisable if you are going to visit risk areas, located in the northeast of the country, such as the Kruger Park. In the big cities there is no risk of being bitten by the mosquito that transmits the disease.

Being located in the southern hemisphere, the seasons in South Africa are the opposite of those in Europe. Winter in South Africa, which runs from June to September, is dry and not too cold. This is the best time to enjoy the wildlife. The vegetation is less lush and the animals concentrate on the rivers to drink. In addition, the southern whale begins to reach the coast. It is also a good season for outdoor activities and sports.

The South African spring is from September to November. Temperatures rise during the day. It is a season that allows us to see beautiful landscapes full of flowers, such as those of the West Coast National Park, about 90 kilometers from Cape Town.

Vaccinations required for travel

And once we have read this post we start with our specific destination. What vaccinations do you need to go to South Africa? Our SOS International insurance offers us all the information to travel without risks.

The limited risk is present in the northwest and northern Cape region along the Molopo and Orange rivers respectively. To consult the malaria risk map of the National Institute of Communicable Diseases (NICD) of South Africa, click here.

Malaria is caused by mosquitoes that usually bite from dusk to dawn. Symptoms can develop in as little as seven days or even several months after exposure. Early symptoms of malaria are flu-like: fever, sweating, chills, headache and muscle aches, and feeling tired and generally unwell. Occasionally, sufferers feel nauseous and have vomiting or diarrhea. If left untreated, malaria can cause serious complications such as anemia, seizures, mental confusion, kidney failure and coma. It can be fatal.

Vaccines for travel to africa from mexico

It is also important to be informed about the health coverage of the country of destination and our medical insurance. It is also important to seek advice on what food to eat or what hygiene measures to take.

Africa is a continent with a wide diversity of fauna, landscapes, traditions and customs. The contrasts from rural areas to urban areas are remarkable, you can go from a place full of vegetation to large deserts. Special care should be taken with the origin of food and drink.

The recommended vaccinations are those that are recommended because of the probability of contracting the disease in the country of destination. Africa, with its diversity of countries, recommends vaccination against poliomyelitis, yellow fever (for those older than 9 months), tetanus-diphtheria, hepatitis A, typhoid fever, cholera or meningococcal meningitis (in some countries such as Libya).

The information provided by this medium can in no way replace a direct medical care service, nor should it be used for the purpose of making a diagnosis, or choosing a treatment in particular cases.

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